Hi there good folk,

The new place i am moving into has the internet come into the house on the other side of where I am planning to have my office + my NAS(which needs ethernet). I much prefer having my stuff connected through ethernet, but not sure what do now, as I cant really run cables across the house. Am also renting the place so cant drill holes in walls etc… As far as I know, there are two ways for me to get ethernet in my office:

  1. COAX to POE: The place does not have ethernet ports in the walls either, but it does have some wallmounted coax sockets. Is it worth looking into coax to poe adapters for either end of the sockets? Not sure how much of a fan I am of this due to the amount of cables this ends up being.

  2. The other way would be to have a WiFi-extender in my office, but i guess this will sacrafice some more speed than the other solution(?). This way I would have a small switch connected to the extender which will get me some more ports too.

I am planning on buying into the Unifi prodcuts, specifically the Unifi Express device as a router. While expensive, I love the polish and feature set and control it brings. What other Unifi devices should I get into, considering probably wont be able to use PoE?

Lemmy know your thoughts, opinions and the rest - am open for all sorts of solutions!

    • r00ty@kbin.life
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      27 days ago

      I think people’s experience with PLE will always be subjective. In the old flat we were in, where I needed it. It would drop connection all the time, it was unusable.

      But I’ve had them run totally fine in other places. Noisy power supplies that aren’t even in your place can cause problems. Any kind of impulse noise (bad contacts on an old style thermostat for example) and all kinds of other things can and will interfere with it.

      Wifi is always a compromise too. But, I guess if wiring direct is not an option, the OP needs to choose their compromise.

      • MystikIncarnate@lemmy.ca
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        27 days ago

        IMO, powerline is going to depend on a lot of factors including what kind of power you use, which varies from country to country. Where I am in North America, we use 240v split phase, and the powerline adapters are 120v (half phase), so if one unit ends up on one side of the phase, and one ends up on the other side of the phase, you’re going to have a bad time, if it links at all… So knowing which “side” of the split phase your powerline is on becomes critical, which is not something most people know about their power situation. As a result, it’s basically a crap shoot whether it will work well or not.

        • brygphilomena@lemmy.world
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          25 days ago

          Most power line adaptors say to keep it on the same circuit. The one I have is running a small VoIP phone and I don’t have issues with call quality.

          • MystikIncarnate@lemmy.ca
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            25 days ago

            Yep, I’m sure they do.

            Realistically, does any average consumer know what’s on which circuit?

            Spanning the split phase will screw you up, across breakers won’t be fun but shouldn’t pose any serious problems, as long as it’s not in different sides of the split phase.

            I’m pretty sure they say this because actually explaining what will work and what won’t either requires significant prior knowledge of power systems, or a couple of paragraphs of explainers before you can get a rough picture of what the hell they’re driving at.

            Everyone I know who has used powerline, just plug it in and see if it works. Those who were lucky, say it’s great and works without issue, etc. Those who were not lucky say the opposite.

            I’m just over here watching the fireworks, eating popcorn.

    • Shadow@lemmy.ca
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      27 days ago

      I spent a year tracking down random afci circuit breaker trips, until I realized it was my powerline Ethernet. Never again.

  • MystikIncarnate@lemmy.ca
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    27 days ago

    I have three suggestions for you.

    Easy mode: find a triple radio mesh wifi system and get at least two nodes. Generally the LAN Jack on the satellite nodes will bridge to the LAN over WiFi. Just add a switch and use it normally. This will harm your overall speeds when connecting to the NAS from other wired LAN systems that are not on the same switch. I’m not sure if that’s important. As long as your internet speed is less than half of your WiFi speed, you shouldn’t really notice a difference.

    Medium mode: buy MoCA adapters and use coax. Just be sure to get relatively new ones. They’re generally all 1G minimum, but usually half duplex, so there’s still sacrifice there, but MoCA is generally better than WiFi. The pinch is making sure you stop the MoCA signal from exiting your premise. You don’t want to tap into someone else’s MoCA network, nor have them tap into yours. There are cable filters that will accomplish this, or you can air gap the coax. I’m not sure how much control you have for the ingress/egress of your coax lines. You can yolo it and just hope for the best, but I can’t recommend that.

    Hard mode: do ethernet anyways. Usually in rentals, nobody can complain with holes in the walls the size you would get from nails to hand pictures, not much larger than a picture hanging nail, is a cup hook. What I did at my old place, which was a rental, was to buy large cup hooks, and put them every ~18" down the hallway, and load it with ethernet cables. I used adhesive cable runners to go down walls near doors and ran the cables under doors to get from room to room. I got lucky that two adjacent rooms shared a phone jack and I replaced the faceplate with a quad port Keystone faceplate on each side. One Keystone was wired to the phone line to keep existing functionality, the rest were connected to eachother though the wall as ethernet, and I just patched one side to the other (on one side was the core switch for my network). That was my experience, obviously your experience will be different. I used white ethernet to try to blend it in with the ceiling/walls which were off-white. In my situation, I was on DSL and used the phone jack in one of the bedrooms for my internet connection, that bedroom was used as an office and it neighbored my bedroom where I used the jack to jack connections through the wall to feed my TV and other stuff in the bedroom. The ethernet on the cup hooks went from the office to the living room where I put a second access point (first ap was on the office) and TV and other stuff. Inbetween the bedrooms and the living room was the kitchen and the wet wall was basically RF blocking, so I needed an access point on either side, so one in the office near the bedroom and bathroom, and one in the living room, provided plenty of coverage for the ~900sqft apartment we were renting. Most everything was on wired ethernet, and the WiFi was used mainly by laptops and cellphones.

    I live by the philosophy of wired when you can, wireless when you have to. Mainly to save WiFi channels and bandwidth for devices that don’t have an easy alternative option like mobile phones and portable computers.

    I don’t think you’re in a bad spot OP, and any of these choices should be adequate for your needs, but that will vary depending on what speed internet you have, and how much speed you need for the LAN (to the NAS and between systems).

    Good luck.

    • ASeriesOfPoorChoices@lemmy.world
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      26 days ago

      absolutely agree with the mesh wifi. Two stations, one at your NAS, one near you. They’ll form a direct high-speed link between each other. Zero effort. Faster than Powerline ethernet, and most other options.

      • MystikIncarnate@lemmy.ca
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        26 days ago

        It can be faster, it really depends on whether you have a clear-ish channel for the mesh, which is why I would recommend something on the higher end, hopefully with a dedicated radio for mesh, so it can be on a different channel with (hopefully) less interference.

        If the mesh radio is shared with client access, or if it’s on a busy channel, it may be much, much slower than some options.

    • Sunny' 🌻@slrpnk.netOP
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      26 days ago

      Thanks for the write up! 🙌

      I will likely go for either option 1 or 3. I need to reevaluate wether cable is possible or not. If not then I’ll go with a mesh. Only “problem” with mesh is that I really wanted to buy into the unifi ecosystem, but their mesh stuff is above my budget. Bit maybe I could just get the unifi express and pair that with another branded mesh system? The place is only 85 square metres, but on two floors. My office is ofcourse furthest away from where the modem comes into the house. Anyway, I will need to evaluate again when I’m there to see if it’s possible or not to run cables. Thanks again for detailed response 💛

      • MystikIncarnate@lemmy.ca
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        26 days ago

        It definitely sounds like you have some challenges ahead. I personally prefer MoCA over wireless, simply because you can control what devices are able to be a part of the network, and reduce the overall interference from external sources and connections.

        With WiFi, being half duplex, only one station can transmit at a time (with come caveats). Whether that station is a part of your network, or it is simply operating on the same frequency/channel, doesn’t matter. So in high density environments, you can kind of get screwed by neighbors.

        MoCA is also half duplex (at least it was the last time I checked) so having a 2.5G MoCA link, to a 1GbE connection (on the ethernet side) should provide similar, or the same experience as pure ethernet (1G full duplex)… The “extra” bandwidth on the MoCA will allow for each station to send and receive at approximately 1Gbps without stepping on eachother so much that you have degraded performance.

        However, it really depends on your situation to say what should or shouldn’t be setup. I don’t know your bandwidth requirements, so I can’t really say. The nice thing about ethernet is that it on switched networks (which is what you’ll be using for gigabit), the. Ethernet kind of naturally defaults to the shortest path, unless you’re doing something foolish with it (like intentionally messing with STP to push traffic in a particular direction). The issue with that is that ethernet doesn’t really scale beyond a few thousand nodes. Not an issue for even a fairly large LAN, but that’s the reason we don’t use it for internet (wan side) traffic routing. But now I’m off topic.

        Given the naturally shortest-path behavior of ethernet, of you have a switch in your office and you only really use your NAS from your office PC, you’ll have a full speed experience. If nothing else needs high-speed access to the NAS, you’ll be fine.

        Apart from the NAS or any other LAN resources, the network should be sufficient to fully saturate your internet connection. So the average WiFi speeds should be targeted towards something faster than your internet link (again, half duplex factors in here). I don’t know your internet speed so I’m not going to even guess what the numbers should be, but I personally aim for double my internet speed for maximum throughput on my WiFi as much as I can. The closer you can get to doubling your internet speed here, the better. Anything more than that will likely be wasted.

        There’s a ton to say about WiFi and performance optimization, but I’ll leave it alone unless you ask about it further.

        Good luck.

        • Sunny' 🌻@slrpnk.netOP
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          26 days ago

          Woah I wish I had the same knowledge you do about networking haha! Taking notes here that’s for sure, thanks for the input!

          • MystikIncarnate@lemmy.ca
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            26 days ago

            I’ve been doing IT work for more than a decade, I was a nerd/“computer guy” well before that. I’ve had a focus on networking in the past 15-20 years. You learn a few things.

            I try to be humble and learn what I can where I can, I know that I definitely do not know everything about it, and at the same time I try to be generous and share what I’ve learned when I can.

            So if you have questions, just ask. I either already know, or I can at least point you in the right direction.

  • Mountain_Mike_420@lemmy.ml
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    27 days ago

    Put the nas and router where the internet comes in at and the just use WiFi for your office and the rest of the house. Thats what 99% of the people do. All the new WiFi routers are really efficient at beam forming and other technologies to get you a decent signal.

    At my house, since it is raised up I was able to crawl under and run Ethernet to the living room for the htpc(gaming) computer and it was pretty easy to install a keystone next to a power outlet. Not sure if that is viable in your situation.

    But even then I didn’t bother running Ethernet to all the rooms because even streaming 4k video is viable over WiFi. Though I understand it might not work so well if trying to edit on a nas or something similar.

    • Sunny' 🌻@slrpnk.netOP
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      26 days ago

      Normally I wouldn’t mind doing this too. But my server is fairly large back box and the Internet comes into the house in a really awkward spot. I might however buy into the new Fractal Mood case, as those seem super slick for leaving servers anywhere in the house.

  • Possibly linux@lemmy.zip
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    27 days ago

    I would look into doing a proper cable run. You would need to do a little drilling but if you have a plan and make it look nice the landlord is unlikely to have an issue with it. Just have a proper wall covering and port on each side.

  • crossover@lemmy.world
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    26 days ago

    I’ve been in similar situations while renting. I ran ethernet cables along skirting boards and around doorframes and hid them inside adhesive cable raceways.

  • spearz@lemmy.world
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    27 days ago

    What about power line adapters? I’ve got a pair and they just sit there doing their thing, no config needed, just plug in and away you go. So long as you’re on the same electric circuit, they’ll connect over that. Mine are made by TP Link and never had a problem (not sure if Unifi make them, sorry). Best of luck to you!

    • Sunny' 🌻@slrpnk.netOP
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      27 days ago

      Didn’t know this was an option even, will defo look into this asap and evaluate wether this fits my use case or not, thanks!

      • MystikIncarnate@lemmy.ca
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        27 days ago

        Depending on where you live and what your power circuits look like (not the outlets, the circuits that power them), you may have a great, or very poor experience.

        I’d need to know what country you live in to know more, since power wiring standards vary from country to country. In the USA and Canada (I’m in Canada and the USA is the same), we use split phase and crossing the split phase will severely hinder the ability for powerline to perform.

        It’s a viable option, not my favorite option, I’d recommend MoCA (coax) over powerline, but it’s ultimately up to you.

      • OminousOrange@lemmy.ca
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        27 days ago

        I had a set of four for getting ethernet around the few places I rented. There was maybe the odd quality decrease when there was a lot of electrical load, but they worked great otherwise.

          • OminousOrange@lemmy.ca
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            27 days ago

            Sorry, four of the power to ethernet plugs. You put one near your router to essentially supply internet to your house’s electrical circuits, then distribute the others where you need them, such as office, living room if you want to connect a TV or console, etc.

  • thayer@lemmy.ca
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    27 days ago

    If it were me and there was no way to have an additional drop installed from the exterior, I would still consider running a single cable through the living space to your desired location, as discreetly as possible.

    It’s difficult to suggest exactly how to do so without pics or a floorplan, but I would try to match the wall or trim color and keep the cable tucked close to the floor and/or ceiling throughout the run.

    Once in place, the cable will quickly disappear into your surroundings and you’ll be left with rock solid reliable networking.

  • Tylerdurdon@lemmy.world
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    27 days ago

    I use one of those coax/Ethernet converters in my house. It’s a 2-story place and running Ethernet was going to be too daunting for a room.

    Overall it works very well (I had bad experiences with using network over electrical power). The only thing that will be a downer is the gigabit coax converters seem to be expensive. Since I just had 1 client in an isolated network, 100mbps was fine for me but would hamper your NAS throughout. You’d also need to buy 2 sets of converters for your use case, so that’s potentially not cheap if you’re wanting gigabit from end to end.

    Some of the newer wireless standards are very quick, but you’d also need to ensure all NICs are compatible and a newer AP wouldn’t be free.

    Perhaps talk to the landlord about splitting the cost of getting Ethernet professionally run in all rooms. It may be the most cost effective solution, but the drawback is you walk away with nothing. The landlord would be able to advertise Ethernet ready infra, so there is some benefit for them to do it.

    • constantokra@lemmy.one
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      27 days ago

      Second this. Landlords don’t want their stuff screwed up by inexperienced tenants’ diy projects, and they don’t want to pay for something they think it’s unnecessary. I’d get an estimate for a pro to do it (could be a guy off Craigslist or whatever, just someone who does this for a living) and then just ask the landlord if they’d be alright with you paying to get it done. They’ll probably want to know exactly what they’re going to do, and they’ll likely say yes, especially since you say they already have coax running through the house.

  • Cyanogenmon@lemmy.world
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    27 days ago

    You can TRY power line adapters:

    TP-Link AV2000 Powerline Adapter https://a.co/d/0fa6e3f3

    Their application can be hit or miss, but mine have been perfect. Had them just under 2 years. Able to get full bandwidth and no discernable latency addition

    • rand_alpha19@moist.catsweat.com
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      27 days ago

      FWIW, these are effective only when both are used on the same circuit. If you live in an older home, the chances of this being the case are higher.

      My entire apartment, except for the washroom, is on the same circuit. It also means I can’t run an air conditioner without tripping the breaker. :|

      • Cyanogenmon@lemmy.world
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        27 days ago

        Maybe it’s ignorance on my part, but my office and the router in the house aren’t on the same circuit.

        Or, at least they have different sections in the breaker.

        House is brand new, put up in 2021

        • Grippler@feddit.dk
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          27 days ago

          It’s not dependent of circuit, things just need to be on the same phase. Our house uses three phases total, so power line adapters only work for 1/3 of the house here.

  • catloaf@lemm.ee
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    27 days ago

    Tell the ISP you’re signing up with that there’s no drop for their service, and have them run a new one to the office. Check your local laws about touching their wire or box on the outside of the house before removing it.

    Also, it’s really easy to patch holes in drywall with a little joint compound and matched paint.

    Otherwise, MoCA and powerline ethernet can work. Modern wifi is pretty good too, though consider walls, etc. between points A and B and which frequency you’ll be using.

    • constantokra@lemmy.one
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      27 days ago

      Landlords are familiar with utility install people and how unpredictable they can be. Even if they get mad, this will put the blame squarely on someone else so it’s probably a good option for you. “I dunno why he put it there. You know how utility guys are. It’s the only place he’d put my hookup.”

  • mystik@lemmy.world
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    27 days ago

    MoCA is a way to send wired Ethernet up to (300mb/s, at least the version i have) over coax. Verizon fios would provide these devices to send internet to set top boxes over existing coax cabling, but you can get a pair of these devices and send Ethernet in on one side, and Ethernet out the other side.

    I have noticed however, it adds a bit of latency to the connection, which may be trouble.

  • pdavis@lemmy.world
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    26 days ago

    I installed cable in a couple of apartments I rented. I just made it look professional and nothing was ever said about it. In one apartment town home I even had access to the attic and was able to run cable in the walls. I did have to drill through the floor and door headers in some instances, but it can be done.

  • ASeriesOfPoorChoices@lemmy.world
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    26 days ago

    Q: why is running a cable across the house not an option?

    it’s not length, since 30m should be enough for most mcmansions.

    it’s not cost, since cables are fairly cheap. Cheapest option there is.

    you run along wall edges, taking the long way if you have to. When crossing open areas, you lay a rubber cable protector over the top (or a strip of carpet with a gutter cut out underneath), to stop tripping and make it look nice.

    • Sunny' 🌻@slrpnk.netOP
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      26 days ago

      You’re probably right, I need to look again at running cables. But it is on separate floors too. Have not moved in yet, so will have to evaluate again when I move in. Thanks for the tips.

      • ASeriesOfPoorChoices@lemmy.world
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        26 days ago

        I’ve run cables between floors, down stairs and such. Stairs make things easier, because you can run the cable across them without tripping anyone, or needing to cover them. You can wind through bannisters to avoid using tape too.

        Also, you should only be running one cable, and putting a switch at the other end.

  • max@lemmy.fish
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    27 days ago

    If it’s cable internet and not fiber/DSL, I’d look at connecting the ISP’s coax to the house’s coax. Provided all of the house’s coax ports are connected to a splitter, you could feed the ISP coax into the nearest port and plug the cable modem into the office port.

  • NeoNachtwaechter@lemmy.world
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    27 days ago

    Where is this happening? Which country, which laws?

    NAS on WiFi works, but it is less fun than NAS on a cable.

    Powerline works only with solid copper wire installed in the walls, connecting these rooms with as few interruptions as possible. Never with flexible lines.

    P.S. corrected PoE to powerline

    • Sunny' 🌻@slrpnk.netOP
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      27 days ago

      Norway. It works, but I dont have a networking card anyways and much prefer having things wired if possible.