I started digging into opensource password managers and found that they all suck major ball sack. I ended up picking nothing. My two runner-ups were bitwarden. It works on Linux, Android, whatever apple’s shit runs on, and even runs on PC’s with the OS that you usually delete first thing. But the major drawback is that I can’t trust it. It’s got a “premium” version, and that has always meant a slow steady spiral into “you must pay now that we have you by the balls” situation. Another drawback is that it’s centralized, kill the company and so go your passwords I suppose.

The other runner up is called liso. This one comes with two major drawbacks. One is that is browser only so far. The other one is that it doesn’t work on Linux yet. Such a shit shit option. Everything else out there wants you to pay for encryption.

I did end up learning about pass on Linux. It creates encrypted passwords and there’s some compatibility with guis and maybe available on Android??? Big question mark. I’ve tried nothing yet. My password list seems to grow daily.

So what’s your favorite one?

  • Echedenyan@lemmy.ml
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    2 years ago

    Reminder that Bitwarden is backed by Microsoft SQL Server even in self-hosted instances (you must use it as backend database service).

    Vaultwarden is a re-implementation that allows you, between other features, to use FLOSS database servers instead.

    • imgprojts@lemmy.mlOP
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      2 years ago

      I feel like Microsoft has too much power. With linked in, they know if you’re working, where and if you got connections. That company strives to rub me the wrong way in so many ways. But it’s cool that there is a floss version.

      • Echedenyan@lemmy.ml
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        2 years ago

        My worries are not focused in how much power that company has but the importance about digital rights, including software freedom between others.

  • Tmpod@lemmy.ptM
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    2 years ago

    BitWarden,¹ it just works really really well everywhere. The app is pretty much the same on every platform (which is a good thing imo) and you also have a CLI in case you prefer (may also be useful in some sort of backup script, I suppose). I personally use the cloud service they provide, but you could very easily and cheaply get a vaultwarden² server up and running and be the total master of your passwords, using a $2.5/m VPS or something like that.


    ¹ https://bitwarden.com
    ² https://github.com/dani-garcia/vaultwarden


    Edit: links
    Edit: also, the premium Bitwarden plan doesn’t mean that at all, imo. The plan can be very useful if you really need those features (sidenote: I advise ever using the TOTP thing, that’s just putting all your eggs into one basket and defeating the purpose of 2FA), it’s very cheap ($10/y iirc) and you can always export all your data with the CLI, setup a server and import that data.

    • imgprojts@lemmy.mlOP
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      2 years ago

      But they limit password sharing to two people. It’s weird. Why? Is that a really good feature? Will they just change policy and screw you over later?

      • Tmpod@lemmy.ptM
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        2 years ago

        It is a way to make some income out of an open-source project. If you want the convenience of their managed server, then you have to pay to access limitless orgs (the way to share secrets), otherwise you’re limited to just a 2-person org. The family pack is quite accessible imo, at $40/y for a 6-person org.
        Your other solution is, like I mentioned before, host your own server. vaultwarden supports orgs, like you can see in their feature list: https://github.com/dani-garcia/vaultwarden/wiki

        BitWarden is really great and a good example of a successful FLOSS project. I get the overall “companies just want to screw you up”, but one must not get completely blinded by it ;)

  • Adda@lemmy.ml
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    2 years ago

    I personally use Bitwarden as a cloud solution and KeePass (KeePassXC for desktop and KeePassDX for mobile phone) as a local solution (I sync KeePass password database with Syncthing across all my devices).

    If you do not trust Bitwarden, you can always self-host your own Bitwarden server (I would use vaultwarden, an unofficial Bitwarden-compatible server written in Rust).

    Alternatively, if you do not want your data to be stored on any server whatsoever, KeePass with decentralized synchronization between devices with Syncthing works really great for me.

    I hope you find what you are looking for.

  • stamp_irl@lemmy.ml
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    2 years ago

    As many said combination of KeePassXC on computer and KeePassXD on android. I sync file with syncthing. For security I have setup three word passphrase, made of words representing unique stuff that was on my desk at the time of creating file, words are connected with symbols not spaces. Even if someone gets my password database file, it will be useless for them.

    KeePass has many adventages:

    • local file, no need for internet to check passwords
    • tested and trusted file format
    • compared to pass (other local solution) encrypts metadata
    • can store more then password: ssh keys, otp
    • tons of applications supporting file format - death of one doesn’t mean anything
    • ree@lemmy.ml
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      2 years ago

      If you’re using a centralised sync system keepass allow keyfiles.

      I use passphrase + keyfile. And I don’t sync the keyfile only copy it manually.

      • stamp_irl@lemmy.ml
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        2 years ago

        Or you can use something like Yubikey as a second layer. Don’t know if that works on mobile.

        • Sr Estegosaurio@lemmy.ml
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          2 years ago

          I’m going to get a YubiKey soon and afaIk that feature does not work on phones. But I’ll check if there’s an issue about it.

    • imgprojts@lemmy.mlOP
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      2 years ago

      Yes. I was actually reading about this one last night after I posted. I decided to give it a try. In a few minutes I got my Google passwords out and translated. Now I need to add my other ton of passwords.

      • stamp_irl@lemmy.ml
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        2 years ago

        There are importers for most of the password storage options. I would recommend separate database for import and then merging import db with your actual database, backing up everything before.

  • obsolete29@lemmy.ml
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    2 years ago

    KeepassDX on Android. KeePassXC on Linux. Sync my password file via Syncthing on my local network.

    • Tempo@lemmy.ml
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      2 years ago

      This is me except I use GNOME’s Password/Secret manager on my PC

      I don’t know how I ever lived without Syncthing honestly

    • imgprojts@lemmy.mlOP
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      2 years ago

      This is working well. My only complaint is that android doesn’t allow Syncthing to write/update to the SD card. It can backup the SD card, but it cannot update a change to it. This is definitely Google’s fault. Whatever is going through their minds, it’s definitely not helping me as a user of memory cards.

  • Sr Estegosaurio@lemmy.ml
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    2 years ago

    KeePass XC/DC (keepass-cli most of the time) with Syncthing is amazing.

    • Fully offline.
    • It can be sync inys your own local network.
    • Secure.
    • Powerfull. (it really has a TON of useful features)
    • Fully FLOSS.
    • Works on all platforms.
  • saud@lemmy.ml
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    2 years ago

    I use pass. It has a really nice app and Firefox extension. Pass might not be the easiest to use, but it’s made using tools that I use everyday(git & gpg) and that gives me a lot of confidence.

  • enebe@lemmy.ml
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    2 years ago

    KeePassDX (Android) + Syncthing to keep the file synchronized between devices.

    I don’t usually open the file on PC, but there are clients for all platforms

  • CritiGalDesist∞@lemmygrad.ml
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    2 years ago

    Personal favorite: Bitwarden, It just works really well without issues and the free version is more than enough for a regular usage. And if you do NOT trust the company or you want the premium features without paying for them then you can self host it for yourself! Another great password manager is Keepass!

  • noodlejetski@lemmy.ml
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    the major drawback is that I can’t trust it. It’s got a “premium” version, and that has always meant a slow steady spiral into “you must pay now that we have you by the balls” situation. Another drawback is that it’s centralized, kill the company and so go your passwords I suppose.

    you can self-host Bitwarden if you want.

  • Captain Beyond@linkage.ds8.zone
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    2 years ago

    Cannot go wrong with KeePass (including derivatives). Works on all my devices, no cloud nonsense, everything is local and I can use Unison and Syncthing to sync it all up.

  • hellfire103@lemmy.ml
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    2 years ago

    My favourite is Bitwarden. FOSS, privacy-respecting, secure and possible to self host: what more could you want?

  • quasimagia@feddit.it
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    2 years ago

    I used Keepass but I dropped it because I had difficulties with sync using ftp servers on linux clients (I think it’s a mono bug) - now I use Devol’s Bitwarden instance and I’m satisfied, but I’m planning to install a little vaultwarden instanse on my RaspberryPi