• Atelopus-zeteki@kbin.run
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      Actually we DID. Tho’ only for a little while. And the results were enormous. The B/Yamgata Influenza lineage appears to have gone extinct. The cool part is we weren’t even trying to do anything with those specific efforts to affect influenza. All of which should encourage us to cooperate more.

        • rtxn@lemmy.world
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          Doctor Ignaz Semmelweiss in the mid-1800s suggested that obstetricians should wash and sterilize their hands before attending their patients to reduce the chance of postpartum infection. He was rejected by the medical community, ridiculed by colleagues, and eventually locked in an asylum where he was killed.

          We’re sliding back in time.

          • Snot Flickerman@lemmy.blahaj.zone
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            People forget the most important bit. The clapback to Semmelweiss from other doctors was “A doctor’s hands are always clean!”

            Humans are irrational fucking idiots and we prove it daily. The number of us who are willing to protect our own in-group over things they don’t deserve to be protected over is too damn high.

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              “A doctor’s hands are always clean!”

              That’s when Semmelweiss should have rubbed dog shit on his hands and tried to rub them on these doctors’ face.

            • Cosmicomical@lemmy.world
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              But it’s very interesting to think where we would be technologically and socially if humans weren’t such assholes

          • e8d79@discuss.tchncs.de
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            24 days ago

            Semmelweiss is also partially responsible for the widespread rejection of his findings. He basically called doctors who did not follow his advice murderers which naturally didn’t help his popularity. Antagonising someone who you are trying to convince usually just entrenches their opinions further.

        • Atelopus-zeteki@kbin.run
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          https://www.wikipedia.org/

          also for the strong of mind: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/

          As a child, once I learned to read, I started to really learn. And naturally shared all the fun facts with most anyone who would listen. I thought I would write a book of fun facts, but then someone invented the Intarwebs. I even thought I would narrow things down and just write ‘Bandana, 1001 Uses’ , but there was no point. (https://duckduckgo.com/?t=ffab&q=bandana+uses+list&ia=web)

    • uriel238@lemmy.blahaj.zone
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      We can’t even come together to wear a peice of cloth to slow the spread of a virus.

      • No one washes their hands — Increased infection rates.
      • Research doctors don’t work — Reduced cure research speed.
      • Sick people given hugs — Infectivity increased once spotted.
        – Plague Inc. description of Easy Difficulty (Written before the 2020 COVID-19 Lockdown)
    • UnderpantsWeevil@lemmy.world
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      The cloth does nothing to stop the virus but also completely cuts off oxygen to your brain.

      No I will not explain. It’s your job to educate yourself by watching more Jordan Peterson videos.

  • Allonzee@lemmy.world
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    Whenever I dare to hope about the lofty, admirable star trek future, I remember that space is completely unforgiving and we just aren’t up to the task for anything more than a token selfie by the best dozen humans we can possibly produce with great effort and training.

    As a species, we aren’t going to spread out there. Still too primitive, and probably too self-destructive to make it out of this phase of evolution. This might be one of those great filters scientists postulate as to why there aren’t signals from innumerable civilizations out there.

    We aren’t even capable of caring for one another, let alone the EASIEST to maintain, most naturally human friendly habitat we would ever encounter in the cosmos as we evolved to fit it. No airlocks, the air/water/waste recycling was already fully automated, all we had to do was not recklessly grow/metastasize to the point we strain the absolutely massive system out of greed and glut, and stop carelessly shitting where we sleep. We all know how that’s been going since we figured out how to make dead animal poison rocket us accross town.

    Master space? Master planetary defense? We can’t even defend this world from our own habitual consumerism. We’ll be lucky if we aren’t scattered tribes living near the old hardened structures of the before times for emergency shelter from the new normal weather events in a hundred years. We’re already starting to argue over the resources it’s taking to rebuild population centers from the current new normal. We have played pretend we were since human civilization began, but we are NOT and never have been this world’s owners or masters, and we are still very much its subject.

    And Reminder, what we’re doing and have been doing in decades won’t be undone for millions of years. The Earth is a self-correcting system, and the damage we’re doing is inconsequential to its 3.8 billion year old, beautiful story of life growing out of every crevice, just not on a timescale humans can benefit from or even truly appreciate.

    Kurzgesagt – In a Nutshell - Great Filter

    • Snot Flickerman@lemmy.blahaj.zone
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      We aren’t even capable of caring for one another

      It’s the part that drives me the most wild. We’re all stuck on this shitty rock hurtling through space together, literally the bare minimum we could do to make it bearable is to be kind to one another and supportive of one another. We can’t even be fucked with bare minimum.

      • Allonzee@lemmy.world
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        Same, if we can’t even, in actions not rhetoric, start from a baseline of “we’re all in the same boat, we all have needs and seek happiness, how do we maximize everyone’s well-being to facilitate that?” then we’re still just savage animals wrestling in the dirt, but with the dangerous capacity to devise technologies for selfish ends we aren’t wise/evolved enough to truly appreciate the consequences of using.

    • cm0002@lemmy.world
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      Tbf, in order for humanity to get where they’re at in the Star Trek timeline they had to go through WWIII: Nuclear edition

      • Allonzee@lemmy.world
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        Covid kind of disillusioned me to the whole “all humanity needs is a common enemy/suffering to get right” concept.

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          Iirc, it wasn’t just that as far as Star Trek goes. Iirc, most world governments and economic systems were destroyed, humanity was a mere fraction of its peak population. Humanity literally physically came together because it was necessary to rebuild.

          Its one thing to have a common enemy/suffering without changing anything else as far as governments and social systems goes. It’s completely different when you not only have the enemy/suffering but to also need to literally rebuild everything from scratch

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              That’s just not true. WWI had a definitive winner in Europe, but not in the Middle-East. And Turks are still killing people unpunished. And Germany wasn’t a definitive loser, despite Entente countries making it really feel that role.

          • grue@lemmy.world
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            Humanity literally physically came together because it was necessary to rebuild.

            I’m pretty sure that didn’t really happen until after the Vulcans showed up, TBH.

            From Memory Alpha:

            During the 2060s, Cochrane and his team of engineers began developing the warp drive. (Star Trek: First Contact) The challenge of inventing warp theory took Cochrane an extremely long time. (ENT: “Anomaly (ENT)”) In 2061, he was responsible for Earth’s first successful demonstration of light speed propulsion, though his work was far from complete. (VOY: “Friendship One”; ENT: “In a Mirror, Darkly, Part II” library computer file) His primary motivation for commencing warp technology was financial gain in the devastated, poverty-stricken America that existed in the wake of the Third World War.

            He finally built Earth’s first warp ship, the Phoenix, in the hope its success would prove profitable and allow him to retire to a tropical island filled with naked women. A historical irony was that, contrary to the fact he went on to use the Phoenix to inaugurate an era of peace, Cochrane incorporated a weapon of mass destruction into its design; he constructed the Phoenix in a silo on a missile complex and used a Titan II missile as his launch vehicle.

            (WWIII ended in 2053; First Contact was on 5 April 2063)

            • cm0002@lemmy.world
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              Ah yea it looks like I was forgetting large parts, either way I think it still reinforces my main point, we will probably go through a lot more pain and suffering before we can even come close to Star Treks timeline

    • grue@lemmy.world
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      I remember that space is completely unforgiving and we just aren’t up to the task for anything more than a token selfie

      “Wow, rude!” – Carl Sagan, probably

    • deadcream@sopuli.xyz
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      I remember that space is completely unforgiving and we just aren’t up to the task for anything more than a token selfie by the best dozen humans we can possibly produce with great effort and training.

      Astronauts aren’t superhumans and there is nothing “special” about their training. They are just pilots with stricter physical requirements. The reason why there aren’t many of them is because there is no need for more. Our technology is not there yet for cheap and “boring” space travel beyond low Earth orbit (and probably won’t be for a century at least). And there isn’t anything worthwhile for humanity out there anyway. At least at the current stage in our “evolution”. So for now manned spaceflight programmes are just vanity projects funded by politicians (for “national pride” or whatever) or some billionaire celebrities like Musk.

      Also I don’t think that world peace would be necessary for space colonization. It could be born out of conflict or for economic reasons, like colonization of Americas. It’s simply that it will take centuries for us to reach a point when the prospect of leaving Earth will become attractive for regular people (if we survive that much of course).

    • Cocodapuf@lemmy.world
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      As a species, we aren’t going to spread out there.

      Well not with that attitude!

      Yeah, space is hard and yeah mistakes have been made along the way. But things are definitely changing. Reusable rockets are nearly here… Between spaceX, rocket lab and stoke aerospace, there is real potential for these rockets to work. Hell, SpaceX has already conducted a successful orbital test flight.

      With reusable rockets we’ll start to see a drastic reduction in the cost to get to orbit, probably by two orders of magnitude, but possibly even more. With the cost down people will reassess the value of space and the resources available there. In other words, people will start doing more in space, and getting more from space. Resource collection, refining and specialized manufacturing are three most likely industries to start expanding into space. Once there is work to be done there it will begin to make sense for people to live there.

      As a species, we aren’t going to spread out there.

      Not today, no. But within my lifetime, I expect we will. Remember, change is usually slow and this would constitute the most profound change in human history.

    • rottingleaf@lemmy.zip
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      While everything living grows old and dies, and has its limits, we separate “<T> revolution” from “<T> normal development” for a reason.

      I mean, what currently exists (with consumerism, incredibly wasteful production of electronic devices doing mostly useless work, less efficient production and organization being preferable when it allows someone to preserve power, Ponzi schemes of various kinds, ignorance and tribalism) is sometimes just a culture, not basic instincts (which have their downsides, but those are solvable). It’s not all cultures.

      That culture has brought us revolutions unseen before. Then it stagnated and may die, but the humanity may survive and have more revolutions in the future.

    • Cocodapuf@lemmy.world
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      We aren’t even capable of caring for one another, let alone the EASIEST to maintain, most naturally human friendly habitat we would ever encounter in the cosmos as we evolved to fit it.

      I would argue that having 8 billion people in the same place makes earth the hardest place to live in some ways.

      One of the options that space habitats would allow for is smaller communities. What if you lived in a space station with roughly the population of a city? Your community wouldn’t necessarily need to be affiliated with other communities to make up a “country”, but it could be. Your community would have that option. And if the community is not geographically connected to the other members of its nation, there’s no reason they couldn’t change their mind, join a different country if you’re views seem better aligned. For the first time humans would have opt-in governance.

      Would opt-in governance lead to a more stable society? Would not being stuck geographically near communities with opposing views lead to less violent aggression? I don’t know, but I hope so.

  • PenisWenisGenius@lemmynsfw.com
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    Congress is making laws about bathrooms and genitals like a bunch of 6th graders running a minecraft server. Of course we can’t handle fucking asteroid defense.

  • Leg@lemmy.world
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    Real talk, an asteroid wiping us out would only expedite the inevitable. If we could pull together and deflect an asteroid, there’s hope. If not, we failed the test and die with the consequences. But we don’t need the asteroid to fail this test. We’re making great strides towards destroying our home with home field advantage.

      • Cocodapuf@lemmy.world
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        I don’t think we ruin everything… We’re also the best around at improving things, certainly improving our environments.

        I know it’s easy to be pessimistic about these things, but humans are evolutionary badasses. We’re capable of amazing things. I wouldn’t count us out just yet.

        Besides we haven’t really ruined anything. We haven’t done any damage to the earth that won’t heal eventually. The earth has seen many heating and cooling cycles and plenty of mass extinctions before and it will again (with or without humans).

          • Cocodapuf@lemmy.world
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            23 days ago

            How many predators can take down prey 50 times their size? How many species can thrive in tundra, jungles, plains, forests, mountains and deserts? How many species can be found on every continent? How many species figured out how to fly despite never developing wings? How many species developed hundreds of distinct methods of communication? How many species have been to the moon?

            Humans are fucking badass…

            • Gloomy@mander.xyz
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              How many predators can take down prey 50 times their size?

              Ants and a couple of Insects I guess. Also Bacteria and Viruses.

              How many species can thrive in tundra, jungles, plains, forests, mountains and deserts?

              Well, obviously also most Bacteria. If we are speaking more sentient live then the answer is: mot of them. Birds, Mammals, Insects. It might take a generation or 10 to get them adopted to their new envirment, but almost every species. Is able to adopt to their evolutoany niche.

              How many species can be found on every continent?

              Most of them?

              How many species figured out how to fly despite never developing wings?

              Technology. Yes, that’s a human thing at last, at least at the level we use it.

              How many species developed hundreds of distinct methods of communication

              Various species have methods of communicating, from bees dancing to each other to whales having distinct regional dialects. Yes, humans have added some complexity to it by introducing technology, but that’s realy what it comes down to. Technology.

              How many species have been to the moon?

              Technology, once more.

              So your point is that humans have learned to use technology, therefor they are badass.

              I disagree. We are living in an absolut singularity tight now. Humans have learned to use finate resources (oil for example) to amplify the energy that we have at our hands. A single humans beeing today can use energy that would be equal to thousands of men’s work every day.

              Since we are drawing on finate resources there are two ways how this will go: we will learn to exploit other, less finate sources of energy (say, fusion) and the groth path will continue (to the stars, eventually). Or we will run out of energy or ruin the livable world by doing so and will fall back to an earlier level of development. Since most of the resources needed are used up we will not be able clime back up. At this moment we are on the second of those paths.

              And in our way in getting here we have started the sixt mass extinction, accidentaly started turning the climate into something less sustainable for humans and polluted every single space on this planet, including areas like the deep ocean that we have never even touched physically.

              Humans are not badass, in my opinion. We are fucking cancer.

              • Cocodapuf@lemmy.world
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                Um, I think you’re mistaking species with kingdom.

                “Birds” are not a species, “mammals” are not a species. I don’t think viruses are even described in terms of species because they don’t reproduce sexually. I think you’ll find that when you actually consider species, most of my points hold.

                Various species have methods of communicating, from bees dancing to each other to whales having distinct regional dialects. Yes, humans have added some complexity to it by introducing technology, but that’s realy what it comes down to. Technology.

                Yes, many species have some rudimentary way of communicating some kinds of information. But obviously bee dances don’t compare to any human language, of which there are literally hundreds. A bee for instance has no way to express appreciation or derision for the English language. My whole point here was that humans, on hundreds of distinct occasions, developed languages capable of conveying complex ideas. No other species has developed a language half as capable as any of ours.

                Rather than picking the rest of that post apart, I’m just going to stop here. It’s pretty self evident that humans are impressive as hell. Denying that is… pretty dumb, and purely rhetorical.

                As a side note, don’t get too excited about fusion, it’s largely a dead end. I expect it will only be really useful in niche applications (like spacecraft). It will be far more expensive than nuclear fision and not really offer any benefits besides abundance of fuel. There’s still a huge radioactive waste problem. On the other hand, the sun provides all the energy we’ll ever need, and we’re getting better at collecting it. I’m really not concerned about increasing energy demands.

  • mriormro@lemmy.world
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    We’ve already solved this. We just need to train a team of dysfunctional oil drillers to send up to the asteroid.

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    We are not at a point where the “global community” is more than a few competing, egoistic and greedy tribes with clashing world views, so that’s no surprise.

    • Cocodapuf@lemmy.world
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      Yeah, I think that really it wouldn’t be the “global community” that ends up saving the world in an asteroid impact scenario.

      It would likely be an organization that could operate on its own without endless committees. Say, the Chinese space agency, or SpaceX, or the Indian space agency. Someone would decide to just do it, without getting the whole world’s approval for the mission. Then the whole world would complain that the effort was made without any international cooperation or oversight. And the organization that literally saved the world would get chewed out by everyone because inevitably the plan will not have worked perfectly.

      But I’m not worried, because even billionaires don’t want to die. Someone would do something.

        • Cocodapuf@lemmy.world
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          I’d trust them to try to intercept an asteroid… It’ll be harmless when they miss and achieve nothing, but in the off chance that they pull it off, yeah sure Boeing, go for it.

    • Jackhammer_Joe@lemmy.world
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      It was a great movie - sadly, because it was so accurate. Provided that you can call a sci-fi movie accurate. But after the pandemic and shit, “don’t look up” looks like a playbook for a meteor extinction level event

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        What’s funny is that movie released during the pandemic, so it seemed like that was the thing it was commenting on, but actually it was filmed before the pandemic and was originally meant as a commentary on climate change. What it shows is that humanity’s modern tribalism is remarkably predictable. No matter what the problem, we will turn it into an us versus them situation where getting anything meaningful done becomes an uphill battle.

      • MindTraveller@lemmy.ca
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        Actually they say that Comet Dibiasky is twice the size of the dinosaur killer, but they also say it’s 6-1 9 kilometres wide. 10 kilometres is the size of Chicxulub. Scientifically it was very inaccurate. But politically it’s flawless.

    • flying_sheep@lemmy.ml
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      That’s the last three words of the article. The author didn’t miss the connection either.

      I always wonder when people repeat something from the article or ask a question that’s answered in the article: did you not read it or did you just want to start a discussion about this connection and are somehow constrained in the number of words you can write per day?

      • MindTraveller@lemmy.ca
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        I didn’t read it. The Register has a drier tone than I felt like reading today. I mean seriously, putting the word tabletop in quotes? I am NOT the target audience for that writing style.

  • rsuri@lemmy.world
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    “Sustaining the space mission, disaster preparedness, and communications efforts across a 14-year timeline would be challenging due to budget cycles, changes in political leadership, personnel, and ever-changing world events,” the report says.

    First administration: “We must do something about the asteroid. I’ve started a plan to divert it, but it’ll take several years.”

    Second administration: “The asteroid is a corrupt globalist conspiracy. We never needed to divert asteroids in the past, why do we supposedly need to spend all your hard-earned tax dollars on this all of a sudden? I will prove my anti-elitist attitudes by cancelling the asteroid program as soon as I take office.”

    Third administration: “Yes we recognize that the asteroid is a threat, but as we saw last time there’s just too much political resistance to solving it. Let’s focus on other priorities that we can solve.”

    • uriel238@lemmy.blahaj.zone
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      If an asteroid were to hit the Earth large enough to cause human extinction, it would save us the embarrassment of killing ourselves from poisoning the climate or microplastic pollution.

      I’m pretty sure we navigated nuclear holocaust, but we haven’t fully ruled it out either.

  • Etterra@lemmy.world
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    That’s okay, humanity had s good run. I imagine we’ll have extinctified ourselves way before a space rock could do it. A+ for trying though.

  • WatDabney@sopuli.xyz
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    I’m roundaboutly reminded of one of my favorite novels - Greener Than You Think, by Ward Moore.

    It’s a science fiction story about the end of the world that was written in the late 40s. The proximate cause of the end is all of the landmasses of Earth being smothered by a gigantic and very aggressive strain of Bermuda grass, but the real cause is the utter and complete failure, due to ignorance, greed, selfishness, short-sightedness, incompetence, arrogance and so on, of every attempt to combat it.

  • AutoTL;DR@lemmings.worldB
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    25 days ago

    This is the best summary I could come up with:


    In an exercise involving multiple US government agencies during April 2024, NASA conducted a so-called “tabletop” game in which participants plot their response to a 72 percent chance that an asteroid may hit Earth in 14 years.

    Underpinning a bewildering number of moving parts is the likelihood that space agencies are not ready to implement the operations needed to find out more about the threat and mitigate it, even with more than a decade to prepare.

    The game also found that the “role of the UN-endorsed Space Mission Planning and Advisory Group (SMPAG) in an asteroid impact threat scenario is not fully understood by all participants.”

    “Sustaining the space mission, disaster preparedness, and communications efforts across a 14-year timeline would be challenging due to budget cycles, changes in political leadership, personnel, and ever-changing world events,” the report says.

    It recommends “periodic briefings and exercises to continue to raise awareness of planetary defense and increase readiness for preparation and response to an asteroid impact threat.”

    Speaking to US public radio service NPR, Terik Daly, planetary defense section supervisor at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory, said experts didn’t know of any asteroids of a substantial size that are going to hit Earth for the next hundred years.


    The original article contains 610 words, the summary contains 206 words. Saved 66%. I’m a bot and I’m open source!

  • hperrin@lemmy.world
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    25 days ago

    Half the population would believe the asteroid is a hoax spread by the [insert ethnic or religious group here].

  • peanuts4life@lemmy.blahaj.zone
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    Call me an optimist, but I think that if an android was actually going to destroy life as we know it, nations would do everything in their power to advert the disaster.

      • no banana@lemmy.world
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        Yeah, I mean it’d at least need to be two androids, right? I’ve seen terminator.

      • Allonzee@lemmy.world
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        “According to The Atlantic, an asteroid that weighs more than 1.7 quadrillion metric tons could sterilize Earth by raising the temperature of its water above 100°C. This asteroid would be 10–1,000 times heavier than the asteroid that killed the dinosaurs and would be between 60–96 kilometers (37–60 miles) wide.”

        The Atlantic article itself is paywalled, but yes, and it’s entirely dependent on the mass of said Asteroid.

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            25 days ago

            Id imagine it doesn’t have to really move fast, just has to sit in the right spot and wait for our orbit around the sun to smash us into it?